Posted by: Terri | November 25, 2014

From Ferguson to Austin – Many Questions, Fewer Answers

“What the people want is very simple – they want an America as good as its promise.”  Barbara Jordan

Barbara Jordan

     I feel like whatever I write tonight will be unsatisfying, but maybe these words will touch someone, somewhere. I happened to go running this morning in a different direction than my normal route, along Shoal creek and under 35th St. It only occurred to me on the way back that I was running past yet another location where an unarmed black man had been killed, Larry Eugene Jackson, Jr.  It was a beautiful morning, but I couldn’t escape the reality that is America today. In this case, the detective involved was indicted.
     It has been an interesting week, to say the least. I feel exhausted from the range of emotions that have come from the barrage of news from immigration, to sexual assault, to Ferguson. With the news that there would be no indictment in the case of Michael Brown Monday evening, I saw similar responses from most of my African American friends — we are all tired. We are tired because yet again we have to come to grips with an institutional structure that devalues the lives of black and brown people. We are tired because we have to explain to our children why people are so frustrated. We are tired of being angry. And yet we soldier on, we try to understand, we create communities online and in real life to try to learn, teach and share so that we can somehow chip away at the underlying issues that lead to these incomprehensible outcomes.
     I believe and hope that we are at a turning point because of the fact that so many African Americans, along with their allies, are in a position to be heard on these issues. We are professors at universities, speaking on radio and television. We are trying to find answers from our research and sharing it on social media. We are marching, taking care of our families, taking care of our careers.
     Today I have been reading the news, blog posts by friends, social media. I see calls for coming together as a community, maintaining hope for the future. I can’t help but be hopeful, it’s my nature. I have to believe that we can find answers to these vexing questions that make me fear for the future of minority communities, and even my own children. For at least the last year or so I have thought long and hard about the issue of social justice, what it means, and what I can do to promote it. I’m disappointed that I’m still trying to find the answer to that question, but I know that there are many of us out there in the same situation.
     So I proudly wore my shirt today, declaring myself “unapologetically black” and that is how I will continue to carry myself. I am cheered by the conversation I had with a friend last week, who will benefit from the President’s executive action on immigration. She is very excited by the fact that for the first time in over 20 years she may be able to go and visit her parents in Mexico with her son who was born here. We all have our struggles, and change is slow. The future is murky, and there are no guarantees that things will improve, but I often describe myself as a change agent and I will rest, rejuvenate and take that next step, hoping that those of us who believe in justice, despite being bloodied and bruised, will go on to fight another day.
things-to-be

Responses

  1. Reblogged this on Ujima Magazine and commented:
    Shared via UjmaMagazine written by Terri Givens.

  2. Hello, I just happened upon your blog while looking for some information on race relations in Austin, TX. (Please forgive me if I’m overstepping or if you find this request inappropriate, just looking for some honest resources.) I may be moving there this spring and am trying to find some women of color from, or living in the Austin area, or mothers with children of color to provide some perspective on race relations down there.

    I hear good things about Austin, though it doesn’t seem to have a lot of diversity. I lived in Dallas shortly many years ago, and as a “Yankee” I was blown away by how segregated things were, and the amount of racism I witnessed. (I’m Caucasian)

    I have a young adult son who is biracial and really want to know what to expect for him. I also want to ensure that my Caucasian toddler isn’t raised in an environment where racism and segregation are just considered social standards.

    I’ve found several “mommy blogs” but most of what I’ve seen the contributors are Caucasian and I’m just not going to get a realistic perspective from them.

    Thank you for your time.


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